The Cannibal Cop Fantasy, Homeless Female Veterans, and IBM's Chef Watson

The Atlantic Wire

Behind the New York Times pay wall, you only get 10 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

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Top Stories: After a beef processing plant closed in Plainview, Texas following the drought, people are beginning to leave.

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World: Miguel Díaz-Canel Bermúdez is heading into a tough job as the "top contender to succeed the Castros after more than half a century of their rule."  

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U.S.: Women returning from military service "are now the fastest growing segment of the homeless population."

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New York: In the case of Gilberto Valle—the cannibal cop—the "clash between real and fantasy was a recurring theme in the courtroom" 

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Business: Large companies including Citigroup and Apple have field a brief arguing that the Supreme Court overturn a part of the Defense of Marriage Act.

Technology: I.B.M. is applying their supercomputer Watson to various fields ranging from health care to the culinary arts. 

Sports: Joel Bauman, a wrestler at the University of Minnesota, was ruled ineligible for releasing a song that can be downloaded for 99 cents on iTunes. 

Opinion: Hans Küng proposes a Vatican Spring

Books: Domenica Ruta is like her memoir "With or Without You"—which chronicles her relationship with her drug abusing mother—in that she's "sharp, intense, funny in that darkly sarcastic way that working-class New Englanders so often are, and given to bursts of strong feeling." 

Fashion & Style: Liza Thorn of the band Starred "is already, albeit grudgingly, a fashion plate."