Exxon Valdez sold, likely destined for scrap heap

Associated Press
FILE - Tugboats pull the crippled tanker Exxon Valdez towards Naked Island in Prince William Sound, Alaska, seen in this April 5, 1989, file photo after the ship was pulled from Bligh Reef. Best Oasis', an Indian company that dismantles old ships, official Gaurav Mehta says his company recently bought the Exxon Valdez, but he declined to say from whom or at what price. He said Friday March 23, 2012 that the vessel is most likely headed for the scrap yard. (AP Photo/Rob Stapleton, File)
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FILE - Tugboats pull the crippled tanker Exxon Valdez towards Naked Island in Prince William Sound, Alaska, seen in this April 5, 1989, file photo after the ship was pulled from Bligh Reef. Best Oasis', an Indian company that dismantles old ships, official Gaurav Mehta says his company recently bought the Exxon Valdez, but he declined to say from whom or at what price. He said Friday March 23, 2012 that the vessel is most likely headed for the scrap yard. (AP Photo/Rob Stapleton, File)

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) β€” The ship formerly known as the Exxon Valdez appears destined to become a scrap heap in a shipyard along India's Gulf of Cambay.

Just days before the 23-year anniversary of the ship's oil spill that devastated the fishing industry and environment of Prince William Sound, Alaska, Hong Kong-based Best Oasis Ltd. confirmed Friday that it bought the ship for an undisclosed amount.

Stan Jones, spokesman for Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council, says two words sum up his and most residents' feeling about the news: good riddance.

Scott Pegau was a student in Fairbanks in 1989, but he now operates research programs for the Oil Spill Recovery Institute in Cordova. He says herring, otters, sea ducks and a killer whale pod are still impacted by the spill.

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Associated Press writer Nirmala George in New Delhi contributed to this report.

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