Factbox: A look at the 2013 Nobel Physics Prize

Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) - Here is a look at the 2013 Nobel Prize for Physics, which was awarded jointly on Tuesday to Peter Higgs, a British physicist who proposed the existence of the boson nearly 50 years ago, and Belgium's Francois Englert:

- The award to Higgs and Englert was for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

- Some famous past winners of the Physics prize include: Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen won the first Nobel Prize in 1901 for his discovery of X-Rays; Guglielmo Marconi in 1909 for his contribution to radio communications; Max Planck in 1918 for quantum theory; Albert Einstein for his theory of relativity in 1921 and Enrico Fermi in 1938 for his work on induced radioactivity.

- 106 Nobel prizes in Physics have been awarded from 1901 to 2012 shared among 193 laureates - John Bardeen was awarded the prize twice.

- The oldest laureate in Physics to date is Raymond Davis Jr., who was 88 years old when he was awarded the prize in 2002. Only two women have won this prize, Marie Curie in 1903 (also awarded the 1911 Nobel Prize in Chemistry) and Maria Goeppert-Mayer in 1963.

Sources: Reuters/Britannica.com/CERN/http://www2.ph.ed.ac.uk/peter-higgs/

(Reporting by David Cutler, London Editorial Reference Unit; Editing by Mike Collett-White)

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