Feds delay policy letting passengers carry knives, bats and other sports equipment on planes

Feds delay policy letting passengers carry knives, bats and other sports equipment on planes

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Feds delay policy letting passengers carry knives, bats and other sports equipment on planes.

The policy, which was to go into effect April 25, has sparked strong opposition from flight attendants, federal air marshals, some pilot unions, and even aviation insurers. In the hands of the wrong passengers, the knives can be used to harm flight attendants and other passengers, critics say.

Several airline CEOs have also expressed qualms. Delta Air Lines chief executive Richard Anderson said in a letter to Pistole last week that he shares the "legitimate concerns" of the airline's flight attendants. US Airways chief Doug Parker asked the TSA administrator to reconsider his position.

Several members of the House committee also urged TSA Administrator John Pistole to drop the proposal, warning that if he doesn't, Congress may take steps to block the policy change.

Pistole had maintained that in these days of hardened cockpit doors and other preventative measures, that the small folding knives were unlikely to be used by terrorists to take over a plane. He adds that searching for knives on passengers is time-consuming. TSA screeners confiscate about 2,000 such knives every day with each incident chewing up two to three minutes, he said.

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