Intel chair challenges account of embassy attack

Associated Press
Soldiers from the Libyan National Army  get ready to enter  Rafallah al-sahati Islamic Militia Brigades compound, one of the compound buildings which can be seen behind the wall, in Benghazi, Libya, Saturday, Sept. 22, 2012.  On Friday evening hundreds of protesters angry over last week's killing of the U.S. ambassador to Libya stormed the compound of the Islamic extremist Ansar al-Shariah Brigade militia suspected in the attack, evicting militiamen and setting fire to their building. After taking over the Ansar compound, protesters then drove to attack the Benghazi headquarters of Rafallah Sahati where militiamen opened fire on the protesters, who were largely unarmed leaving at least 20 wounded, and several killed according to hospital sources. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)
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Soldiers from the Libyan National Army get ready to enter Rafallah al-sahati Islamic Militia Brigades compound, one of the compound buildings which can be seen behind the wall, in Benghazi, Libya, Saturday, Sept. 22, 2012. On Friday evening hundreds of protesters angry over last week's killing of the U.S. ambassador to Libya stormed the compound of the Islamic extremist Ansar al-Shariah Brigade militia suspected in the attack, evicting militiamen and setting fire to their building. After taking over the Ansar compound, protesters then drove to attack the Benghazi headquarters of Rafallah Sahati where militiamen opened fire on the protesters, who were largely unarmed leaving at least 20 wounded, and several killed according to hospital sources. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)

WASHINGTON (AP) — A leading House Republican is challenging the White House's initial account that the attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya was a spontaneous assault tied to protests over an anti-Islam video.

President Barack Obama has said extremists used the video as an excuse to launch the attack, which killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

Rep. Mike Rogers of Michigan, who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, told CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday he'd seen "no information" that anti-film protests were ongoing prior to the assault and that the administration was "ill-advised" to link the two.

Robert Gibbs, a senior adviser to the Obama campaign, told Fox News Sunday that the investigation continues and "no one wants to get to the bottom of this more than the president."

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