Japan, US admirals say naval cooperation deepening

Associated Press
Japanese navy commander Adm. Katsutoshi Kawano, left, and U.S. Pacific Fleet commander Adm. Harry Harris listen to a reporter's question in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Monday, July 14, 2014. The admirals, meeting on the sidelines of the world's largest maritime exercises, say cooperation between their two navies is deepening. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)
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Japanese navy commander Adm. Katsutoshi Kawano, left, and U.S. Pacific Fleet commander Adm. Harry Harris listen to a reporter's question in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Monday, July 14, 2014. The admirals, meeting on the sidelines of the world's largest maritime exercises, say cooperation between their two navies is deepening. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (AP) — U.S-Japan naval cooperation is deepening, top U.S. and Japanese admirals said Monday as they met on the sidelines of the world's largest maritime exercises.

Adm. Katsutoshi Kawano, the head of Japan's navy, told reporters before a meeting with U.S. Pacific Fleet commander Adm. Harry Harris that the two navies have been sharing more information and having more personal exchanges.

More than 25,000 military personnel from 22 nations are participating in the Rim of the Pacific exercises, which last through early August. Japan sent two destroyers, a helicopter, a dive unit, a submarine surveillance plane and land forces to the exercises in Hawaii waters.

Harris said cooperation between the two navies keeps improving, adding that he has personally seen the relationship evolve since he was first stationed in Japan in 1983.

A July 1 decision by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's cabinet to pursue a new law that would allow Japan to help defend its allies is an example of their close relationship, Harris said.

The policy reinterprets Japan's war-renouncing constitution to say Japan may help defend countries with which it has close ties. For example, a Japanese ship would be able to legally shoot down a North Korean missile heading for U.S. territory. Japan may not legally do this currently.

"I think that's a bold decision, a landmark decision, and I welcome anything that would bring us even closer together — and this certainly will," Harris said.

Critics in Japan say the new policy would leave the door open for Tokyo's eventual participation in conflicts such as the war in Iraq. Japanese forces have previously limited their participation in conflict zones to noncombat roles, even when joining U.N. peacekeeping activities.

Kawano said Japan's parliament would need to pass a law on the policy before his forces could put it into effect operationally.

"If Japan moves in the direction of collective self-defense, I believe the Maritime Self-Defense Force and the U.S. Navy will have an even more cooperative relationship," Kawano said.

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