Just Explain It: The Internet And The World Wide Web

We’ll just say it. The World Wide Web and the Internet are not the same thing. We know, you might be shocked.

The Internet and the World Wide Web have become integral parts of our lives. For some going online is the first thing you do when you wake up and the last thing you do before going to bed.

But how they’re different and how they work together is the focus of today's Just Explain It.

The World Wide Web is the information, in the form of websites, that is found on the Internet. But before we get into that, here’s what they are and how they work together.

[Related: Why Americans Need Social Media “Vacation”]

The Internet’s precursor began as a U.S. military project in the 1950’s. It was called ARPAnet and eventually came online when it connected four university computers in 1969.

By 1984, it linked 1000 computers and was renamed the Internet, for interconnected network. And by 2012, the Internet had grown to 8.7 billion connected devices. While the Internet is the hardware made up of computers, servers, switches, and routers that contain data and allow it to travel, it’s also the software and communication protocols that allows different computers and networks to communicate. That makes it a “network of networks.”

The World Wide Web, on the other hand, allows users to access the information on the Internet by displaying web pages on a browser. Tim Berners-Lee created the Web in 1989, and in 1991 the first web page went live. There are now almost 650 million websites in the world.

[Related: Father Of The Web Scolds “Hypocritical” West Over Spying]


So, the Web is just one type of traffic on the Internet. Email, video chat, gaming, and many other types of data are like different kinds of vehicles that travel and rely on the infrastructure of that superhighway called the Internet.

How does the World Wide Web show information from the Internet?

As you already know, to get to a website, you type in its web address or uniform resource locator - better known as a URL – into a web browser. Entering the URL sends a request to a domain name server, or DNS, to access that website's server. Like a translator, the DNS converts the URL into an IP address. Every server and computer connected to the Internet has an IP, or Internet protocol, address. You could type an IP address into your browser, but IP addresses can change, and it's much easier to remember an address like yahoo.com.

After the DNS tells your computer the website’s correct IP address, your computer can then directly contact the website’s server. The website’s server responds to the request and sends the information back to your computer. Your computer’s web browser converts the information into a readable form. That's the website you see on your computer screen.

So, what do you think? What kind of vehicle do you prefer to drive on the Internet superhighway? Leave us your comments below or on Twitter using the #JustExplainItNews.
Loading...
  • Tennis-Down but not out, Djokovic just glad to make final

    By Ian Ransom MELBOURNE, Jan 30 (Reuters) - A solemn Novak Djokovic will look for positives from his previous clashes at Melbourne Park after playing arguably his worst match of the tournament in edging a mentally "dead" Stan Wawrinka in five sets on Friday. Djokovic will meet sixth seed Andy Murray in his fifth final at Melbourne Park but is unlikely to glean inspiration from a video review of the match against Wawrinka, who later described himself as "mentally completely dead" with "no battery". "I can say I'm glad, of course I'm happy and satisfied to go through," Djokovic told reporters, devoid of his usual good humour.

  • Tennis-Williams bids to continue tyranny of Sharapova

    By Ian Ransom MELBOURNE, Jan 30 (Reuters) - One of the few players with the game to trouble Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova's decade-long losing streak to the American great is one of the more curious anomalies in women's tennis. Sharapova was a 17-year-old sensation when she last beat Williams at the title-decider of her debut at the season-ending Tour Finals in 2004. It has all been one-way traffic since with Williams notching 15 successive victories on all surfaces, a record that Sharapova has been reminded of, again and again, before her bid to break the streak in the Australian Open women's final on Saturday. "I go into matches where I've beaten opponents and I don't want to focus on that because I don't want to get overly confident going onto the court," Sharapova said on Friday.

  • Serena and Sharapova's 'black heart' rivalry
    Serena and Sharapova's 'black heart' rivalry

    The bitter rivalry between Australian Open finalists Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova took root on the hallowed Wimbledon turf in 2004 and is still thriving more than a decade later -- both on and off the court. The problem was, the fairytale victory that catapulted her to global celebrity came at the expense of Serena Williams -- top seed at the time and hot favourite for a third straight Wimbledon title -- a result that the American has never forgotten. It has spurred her on to an overall record of 16-2 against Sharapova, with the Russian's last victory over the world number one coming more than a decade ago. Since 2005, the American's winning streak is 15-0, including straight sets wins over Sharapova in the Australian and French Open finals (2007 and 2013), as well as the gold medal match at the 2012 London Olympics.

  • Djokovic beats Wawrinka to reach Australian Open final

    MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Novak Djokovic will contest the final of the Australian Open with Andy Murray after beating defending champion Stan Wawrinka 7-6(1) 3-6 6-4 4-6 6-0 on Friday. Djokovic will bid to become the first man in the professional era to win five titles at Melbourne Park. (Reporting by Ian Ransom; Editing by ...)

Follow Yahoo! News