• Is Boredom Good For You?



    Boredom is an unpleasant feeling that we usually try to avoid at all costs. No one likes to be bored.

    For some students, boredom can peak right about now - during their summer vacation. No school means a decline in extracurricular activities and less social time with friends at school.

    [Related: 5 Kid Friendly Sites for Bored Children]

    In the past, boredom had not received a lot of attention from the scientific community. But recent studies have found that it could be directly connected to your health.

    So is being bored good or bad for you? We’ll answer that question in this Just Explain It, and provide some tips on how to beat boredom.

    First, what exactly is boredom?

    According to Dr. John Eastwood, a clinical psychologist at York University in Ontario, Canada, boredom sets in when our ability to pay attention fails. I know, it sounds pretty obvious. But it may be the result of a combination of factors.

    1.    The situation itself may not be stimulating.
    2.    A predisposition to boredom.
    3.    Read More »from Is Boredom Good For You?
  • Bad Breath's Surprising Remedy

    It's something no one likes to talk about. It's embarrassing to tell someone they have it, and very embarrassing if you have it: Bad breath!

    Clinically known as halitosis, bad breath can affect anyone. We’ll tell you the most common cause of bad breath, and one simple solution to help you control it. That's the subject of today's Just Explain It.

    Americans spent billions of dollars on dental care in 2010, according to a study by the Pew Center on the States. However after all that money, most people will continue to battle bad breath.

    [Related: Will Obamacare Take Bite Out of Dental Coverage?]

    We all know onions or garlic can contribute to bad breath, but did you know that even when food is digested and then processed through your bloodstream, odors could be released from your lungs as you exhale?

    Other causes of bad breath include heartburn and acid reflux. Tonsilloliths, or tonsil stones, can also make a mouth smell not so fresh. Tonsil stones are calcified deposits of bacteria, food Read More »from Bad Breath's Surprising Remedy
  • Just Explain It: The Only Child Myth


    $295,560. That's how much a middle class couple can expect to spend on a child born in 2011 until his or her 18th birthday, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. And by the way, it doesn't even include saving for college or the added expense if your adult child moves back home.

    The cost of raising a child is one of a few factors persuading some couples to have one child, despite the societal and familial pressure many parents feel to have more.

    So, why do some people buck tradition and choose to have just one child? And is there any truth to myths many of us have about only-children?

    Answering those questions is the subject of today's Just Explain It.

    Along with the cost of raising a child, the uncertain economy and delaying marriage and pregnancy are pushing parents to have fewer children. According to Census data, the percentage of families with kids that have only one child was 33% in 1970. In 2011 that number was 43%. And the National Center for Health Statistics said the Read More »from Just Explain It: The Only Child Myth
  • Just Explain It: The Internet And The World Wide Web

    We’ll just say it. The World Wide Web and the Internet are not the same thing. We know, you might be shocked.

    The Internet and the World Wide Web have become integral parts of our lives. For some going online is the first thing you do when you wake up and the last thing you do before going to bed.

    But how they’re different and how they work together is the focus of today's Just Explain It.

    The World Wide Web is the information, in the form of websites, that is found on the Internet. But before we get into that, here’s what they are and how they work together.

    [Related: Why Americans Need Social Media “Vacation”]

    The Internet’s precursor began as a U.S. military project in the 1950’s. It was called ARPAnet and eventually came online when it connected four university computers in 1969.

    By 1984, it linked 1000 computers and was renamed the Internet, for interconnected network. And by 2012, the Internet had grown to 8.7 billion connected devices. While the Internet is the hardware made up of Read More »from Just Explain It: The Internet And The World Wide Web

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