• The Social Network Most Recruiters Use

    If you are looking for a job and aren't on LinkedIn, you may want to hurry up and join: 97 percent of recruiters are using the self-proclaimed "world's largest professional network" as a place to find new employees, a new study has found.

    Other social networks were much less popular among recruiters, the research by Bullhorn Reach found. Twitter, the second most popular network for recruiters, was used by just 27 percent of recruiters. An even smaller percentage — 22 percent — of recruiters turned to Facebook as a source for recruiting.

    For the most part, recruiters aren't focusing their recruiting efforts on more than one social network. Just 12 percent of recruiters said they utilize all three major social networks — Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. However, 14 percent of respondents said they use a combination of LinkedIn and Twitter, compared to just 8 percent who said they use LinkedIn and Facebook.    

    [Social Recruiting Becomes the Norm]

    Though most recruiters do not use a

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  • Workers Say Bosses Cause Them to Quit Facebook

    Workers really don’t want to be friends with their bosses … at least on Facebook. New research has found that workers say they have suspended their accounts or left Facebook altogether to avoid being friended by a boss on the social network.

    That finding was a part of research by researchers from Cornell University that examined the reasons why  people leaft Facebook or suspended their accounts.

    Concerns about privacy and misuse of data were also cited as reasons why users were making the choice to close their accounts.  Facebook users also say that addiction to the social network and the negative productivity associated with it were also reasons to leave Facebook. However, others were also more fearful of being friended by former romantic partners in their decision to leave the network.

    [6 Signs You're Addicted to Facebook]

    "In some cases, people reported feeling pressured to leave based on an institutional status, such as being a military officer or parolee," said Eric Baumer, lead

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  • Just Explain It: Crowdsourcing To Solve Crimes

    You may have heard of crowdsourcing when it comes to raising money, like the popular website Kickstarter allows. But at its core, crowdsourcing is getting a lot of people to help solve a single problem.

    After the attack at the Boston Marathon, law enforcement asked the public for help to find the perpetrators. As usual, authorities asked people to report if they saw anything suspicious and they asked for help identifying the suspects in the surveillance tapes that the FBI released.

    But in what’s becoming a new trend, officials also asked the public for photos and video. The response was overwhelming. Within days, local police and federal agents received thousands of images and many terabytes of digital data captured on smartphones and other mobile devices

    So, how well has using “the crowd” to solve crimes worked? And what are the downsides of the public getting involved? That's the subject of today's Just Explain It.

    The Boston Marathon bombing may be a high-profile case where we’re seeing

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  • In Boston manhunt, online detectives flourish

    SEATTLE (AP) — The intensive manhunt for the bombers behind the deadly Boston Marathon attacks didn't take place only on the streets with professional police officers and SWAT teams. In an era of digital interactivity, it also unfolded around the country from laptops and desk chairs filled with regular folks.

    Fueled by Twitter, online forums like Reddit and 4Chan, smartphones and relays of police scanners, thousands of people played armchair detective as police searched for men who turned out to be suspects Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, ethnic Chechen brothers who had immigrated from southern Russia years ago.

    But as amateur online sleuths began identifying possible culprits, caught in the virtual manhunt were people who were wrongly accused or placed under suspicion by crowdsourcing. It showed the damage that digital investigators can cause and raised a relevant question: In the social-media generation, what does law enforcement unleash when, by implication, it deputizes the public

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