London's Olympic Orbit tower gets decked in light

Associated Press
File - The London 2012 Olympic Stadium is seen at about sunset, with the partially completed ArcelorMittal Orbit  at the Olympic Park in London, in this Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 file photo. London's Legacy Development Corporation says the ArcelorMittal Orbit will be decked in 250 color spotlights that will make it a ''beacon of east London.'' The lights will be wound through the 114.5 meter (375 foot) tower and become the center of a 15-minute nightly light show. The corporation says the effects will be tested over the next two weeks. The ruby red tower that vaguely resembles a squashed roller coaster sits beside Olympic Stadium inside the Stratford park. It is hoped it will become a major tourist attraction once the July 27-Aug. 12 games draw to a close.(AP Photo / Alastair Grant, file)
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LONDON (AP) — Watch out, Eiffel Tower. Lights are coming to London's Orbit.

The ArcelorMittal Orbit, a 114.5-meter (375-foot) ruby red tower in the center of Olympic Park, will be decked out in 250 color spotlights that will make it a "beacon of east London," London's Legacy Development Corporation said in a statement.

The corporation has responsibility for the park after the end of the Olympics, which take place from July 27-Aug. 12. The corporation has secured planning permission to light the tower from dusk until midnight.

The lights wound through the tower will be used in a 15-minute nightly light show. The effects are being tested over the next two weeks.

The tower is designed by London-based artist Anish Kapoor, a previous winner of the prestigious Turner Prize, and his design partner Cecil Balmond.

"The feature lighting opens a completely new artistic aspect to the work of Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond," Andrew Altman, the chief executive of the London Legacy Development Corporation, said in a statement. "It will create a vivid landmark with dynamic effects that we can use in tandem with different events."

The Orbit, which vaguely resembles a squashed roller coaster, will reopen in 2014 and be able to accommodate up to 5,000 visitors a day. London officials hope it will become a major tourist attraction.

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