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Most senators vote to OK Yellen to lead Fed

Associated Press
FILE - In this Nov. 14, 2013 file photo, Janet Yellen, of California, smiles as she is introduced as being the first female to be nominated as Federal Reserve Board chair, prior to testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate is ready to approve Yellen’s nomination to become the first woman to lead the Federal Reserve in its century-long history. Yellen is a long-time advocate of fighting unemployment and a backer of the central bank’s recent efforts to spur the economy with low interest rates and massive bond purchases. She was expected to win easy approval in Monday’s vote. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
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FILE - In this Nov. 14, 2013 file photo, Janet Yellen, of California, smiles as she is introduced as being the first female to be nominated as Federal Reserve Board chair, prior to testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate is ready to approve Yellen’s nomination to become the first woman to lead the Federal Reserve in its century-long history. Yellen is a long-time advocate of fighting unemployment and a backer of the central bank’s recent efforts to spur the economy with low interest rates and massive bond purchases. She was expected to win easy approval in Monday’s vote. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of senators have voted to confirm Janet Yellen as the first woman to lead the Federal Reserve.

A Senate roll call on Yellen is underway and could be lengthy because of airline flight delays, including many caused by bad weather. But so far, at least 55 of the 100 senators have voted for her nomination, assuring her confirmation.

Yellen has been vice chair of the Fed since 2010. She has been a strong advocate of fighting unemployment and of policies championed by the current chairman, Ben Bernanke, designed to spur the economy with low interest rates and massive bond purchases.

Yellen will begin her four-year term on Feb. 1.

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