NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds More Shiny Objects on Mars

ABC News
NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds More Shiny Objects on Mars
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When NASA's Curiosity rover found a shiny object on Mars last week, researchers believed it was just part of the rover. But now, the rover has found more bright objects in Mars' soil, leading NASA officials to believe it is something native to the planet.

NASA sent commands to Curiosity Monday to take a third sample of soil from Mars to learn more about the shiny objects.

"Confidence for going ahead with the third scooping was based on new assessment that other bright particles in the area are native Martian material," NASA said in a statement. "One factor in that consideration is seeing some bright particles embedded in clods of Martian soil."

SEE MORE: CURIOSITY'S FINDINGS ON MARS

The first sample taken on Oct. 7 found a shiny object that they determined was a piece of the rover. During the second scooping on Oct. 12, more bright objects were found in a hole made by the scooping, leading researchers to believe this is something native to mars.

"At that point when they first saw the bright particles in the hole created by the second scoop they weren't sure what they were," NASA spokesman, Guy Webster, told ABCNews.com.

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