Not unstoppable: Sandy tapering out in Appalachia

Associated Press
A lone parked car is draped  with snow covered branches south of Morgantown, W.Va. from a snowfall on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. West Virginia's death toll climbed to at least six and hundreds of thousands remained without power Wednesday, Oct. 31, from the wet, heavy snow that superstorm Sandy dumped on the mountains, snapping trees, pulling down power lines and collapsing homes. (AP Photo/The Dominion-Post, Ron Rittenhouse)
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A lone parked car is draped with snow covered branches south of Morgantown, W.Va. from a snowfall on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. West Virginia's death toll climbed to at least six and hundreds of thousands remained without power Wednesday, Oct. 31, from the wet, heavy snow that superstorm Sandy dumped on the mountains, snapping trees, pulling down power lines and collapsing homes. (AP Photo/The Dominion-Post, Ron Rittenhouse)

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — It felt like Superstorm Sandy would never go away. But its days are numbered.

The storm is winding down days after it swamped the East Coast, buried states in snow and killed dozens of people.

The National Weather Service said Wednesday that the last effects of the remnant low that was Sandy are being felt in the Appalachian mountains.

The storm brought up to 3 feet of snow to parts of West Virginia and Maryland and put thousands in the dark. The Weather Service says several more inches are possible before the storm dies out for good later this week.

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