The One Thing Not to Reveal In a Job Interview

LiveScience.com

No matter how nervous you are in a job interview, don't let on. That's the advice of recently surveyed hiring managers who say nothing will sink your chances of getting the job faster than showing a lack of confidence. 

However, lacking confidence is far from the only thing that will hurt job candidates in their quest to get a job. A survey of those doing the hiring – mainly at small businesses – revealed their interview pet peeves.

In addition to lacking confidence, hiring managers say that inappropriate wardrobe choices will also hurt the job chances of prospective employees. Hiring managers also say that candidates who do not make eye contact and candidates who check their phones during an interview hurt themselves in a big way.

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Other lesser offenses that can still hurt candidates during a job interview including fidgeting and bad posture, hiring managers say.

Additionally, the research, which was based on the responses of 500 hiring managers, revealed that those in charge of hiring decisions also want candidates to be engaged in the interview process. Thirty-three percent of hiring managers say that job seekers should first and foremost be engaged and ask questions in the interview process. Job seekers should also show their personality and be authentic, the researchers found.  

Those in charge of hiring decisions also say that job seekers should be flexible in order to improve their chances of getting a job. Hiring managers say one way they can do this is by accepting a job and starting in another position within the company.

Getting to the interview process presents a whole other set of problems for job seekers, the researchers say.  Fifty-four percent of respondents say that candidates without a strong resume will not make it to the interview phase.  Additionally, 43 percent say that spelling errors on a resume will automatically disqualify a candidate.

This story was provided by BusinessNewsDaily, a sister site to LiveScience. Follow David Mielach on Twitter @D_M89 . Follow us @bndarticlesFacebook or Google+. Originally published on BusinessNewsDaily.

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