Opening statements begin in Zimmerman trial

Associated Press
FILE - This June 20, 2013 file photo, George Zimmerman listens as his defense counsel Mark O'Mara questions potential jurors during Zimmerman's trial in Seminole circuit court in Sanford, Fla. Judge Debra Nelson said Saturday, June 22, 2013, that prosecution audio experts who point to Trayvon Martin as screaming on a 911 call moments before he was killed won't be allowed to testify at trial. Opening statement begin Monday June 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Orlando Sentinel, Gary Green, Pool, file)
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FILE - This June 20, 2013 file photo, George Zimmerman listens as his defense counsel Mark O'Mara questions potential jurors during Zimmerman's trial in Seminole circuit court in Sanford, Fla. Judge Debra Nelson said Saturday, June 22, 2013, that prosecution audio experts who point to Trayvon Martin as screaming on a 911 call moments before he was killed won't be allowed to testify at trial. Opening statement begin Monday June 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Orlando Sentinel, Gary Green, Pool, file)

SANFORD, Fla. (AP) — George Zimmerman's defense attorneys can use statements the neighborhood watch volunteer made to a police officer and neighbor immediately after he fatally shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

Judge Debra Nelson made the ruling Monday that the remarks could be used shortly before opening statements in Zimmerman's second-degree murder trial.

Zimmerman told the officer and neighbor that he was yelling for help but nobody responded during his confrontation with Martin.

Zimmerman is pleading not guilty to second-degree murder, claiming self-defense.

Arguments over whether the remarks could be used by the defense delayed opening statements by a few minutes.

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