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In this 1862 photo made available by the Library of Congress, President Abraham Lincoln and Gen. George B. McClellan sit in the general's tent after the Battle of Antietam near Sharpsburg, Md. McClellan's skill in organizing and preparing troops was what made Lincoln elevate him to command, even though the president had long been frustrated by another defining trait of "Little Mac" - his paralyzing deliberateness and tendency to grossly exaggerate the forces he faced. As a general, he was the temperamental opposite of Gen. Robert E. Lee. (AP Photo/Library of Congress, Alexander Gardner)

Associated Press
In this 1862 photo made available by the Library of Congress, President Abraham Lincoln and Gen. George B. McClellan sit in the general's tent after the Battle of Antietam near Sharpsburg, Md. McClellan's skill in organizing and preparing troops was what made Lincoln elevate him to command, even though the president had long been frustrated by another defining trait of "Little Mac" - his paralyzing deliberateness and tendency to grossly exaggerate the forces he faced. As a general, he was the temperamental opposite of Gen. Robert E. Lee. (AP Photo/Library of Congress, Alexander Gardner)
In this 1862 photo made available by the Library of Congress, President Abraham Lincoln and Gen. George B. McClellan sit in the general's tent after the Battle of Antietam near Sharpsburg, Md. McClellan's skill in organizing and preparing troops was what made Lincoln elevate him to command, even though the president had long been frustrated by another defining trait of "Little Mac" - his paralyzing deliberateness and tendency to grossly exaggerate the forces he faced. As a general, he was the temperamental opposite of Gen. Robert E. Lee. (AP Photo/Library of Congress, Alexander Gardner)
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