1963 at 50: A year's tumult echoes still

Associated Press
FILE - In this June 11, 1963 file photo, Gov. George Wallace blocks the entrance to the University of Alabama as he turned back a federal officer attempting to enroll two black students at the university campus in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Wallace backed down when President John Kennedy federalized the Alabama National Guard and ordered troops to Tuscaloosa. Wallace's daughter, Peggy Wallace Kennedy, said her family has lived in the shadow of the schoolhouse door ever since. She said her father never told her why he did it and she never asked him before he died in 1998. Since then, she has been involved in civil rights events in Alabama. She wants to give hope to people by showing that families can change.  (AP Photo/File)

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A new year was just beginning — an extraordinary year, in which so much would change.

Half a century ago, on Jan. 14, 1963, George Wallace took the podium to give his inaugural address as governor of Alabama. His words framed a fiery rejoinder to a civil rights movement gathering strength.

"I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny," he thundered, "and I say, segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever!"

Fifty years later, the words still have the power to shock. In college classes like "The Sixties in History and Memory," today's students recoil. (AP)

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