In this 2003 photo provided by Geoffrey Wheeler and the National Institute 

In this 2003 photo provided by Geoffrey Wheeler and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, physicist David Wineland adjusts an ultraviolet laser beam used to manipulate ions in a high-vacuum apparatus containing an "ion trap" used to demonstrate the basic operations required for a quantum computer. Wineland and Serge Haroche of France shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 for inventing methods to observe the bizarre properties of the quantum world, research that has led to the construction of extremely precise clocks and helped scientists take the first steps toward building superfast computers. (AP Photo/NIST, Geoffrey Wheeler)
Associated Press
In this 2003 photo provided by Geoffrey Wheeler and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, physicist David Wineland adjusts an ultraviolet laser beam used to manipulate ions in a high-vacuum apparatus containing an "ion trap" used to demonstrate the basic operations required for a quantum computer. Wineland and Serge Haroche of France shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 for inventing methods to observe the bizarre properties of the quantum world, research that has led to the construction of extremely precise clocks and helped scientists take the first steps toward building superfast computers. (AP Photo/NIST, Geoffrey Wheeler)
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