In this 2005 photo provided by CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, technicians check the magnets that will direct protons towards the target for the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) project in Geneva. The project team, a collaboration between France's National Institute for Nuclear and Particle Physics Research and Italy's Gran Sasso National Laboratory, fired a neutrino beam 454 miles (730 kilometers) underground from Geneva to Italy. They found it traveled 60 nanoseconds faster than light. That's sixty billionth of a second, a time no human brain could register. Physicists on the team said Friday Sept. 23, 2011 they were as surprised as their skeptics about the results, which appear to violate the laws of nature as we know them. (AP Photo/CERN)

Associated Press
In this 2005 photo provided by CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, technicians check the magnets that will direct protons towards the target for the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) project in Geneva. The project team, a collaboration between France's National Institute for Nuclear and Particle Physics Research and Italy's Gran Sasso National Laboratory, fired a neutrino beam 454 miles (730 kilometers) underground from Geneva to Italy. They found it traveled 60 nanoseconds faster than light. That's sixty billionth of a second, a time no human brain could register. Physicists on the team said Friday Sept. 23, 2011 they were as surprised as their skeptics about the results, which appear to violate the laws of nature as we know them. (AP Photo/CERN)
In this 2005 photo provided by CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, technicians check the magnets that will direct protons towards the target for the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) project in Geneva. The project team, a collaboration between France's National Institute for Nuclear and Particle Physics Research and Italy's Gran Sasso National Laboratory, fired a neutrino beam 454 miles (730 kilometers) underground from Geneva to Italy. They found it traveled 60 nanoseconds faster than light. That's sixty billionth of a second, a time no human brain could register. Physicists on the team said Friday Sept. 23, 2011 they were as surprised as their skeptics about the results, which appear to violate the laws of nature as we know them. (AP Photo/CERN)
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