Nigerian born Joseph Efe (top row 3rd R) his wife, Cameroonian born Siven Relindise (top row 2nd R) and their sons Esse (bottom R) and Limnyoy (bottom 2nd R) attend a ceremony where they are ... more 
Nigerian born Joseph Efe (top row 3rd R) his wife, Cameroonian born Siven Relindise (top row 2nd R) and their sons Esse (bottom R) and Limnyoy (bottom 2nd R) attend a ceremony where they are naturalised as Germans at Neukoelln town hall in Berlin, November 26, 2013. Efe, a political scientist, and his wife Siven Relindise, a medical doctor, met as students in Berlin in 2000 and decided to apply for German citizenship to avoid the continual bureaucratic obstacles facing non-European Union immigrants working in Germany. While a political agreement between Germany and his native Nigeria allows Efe to keep his Nigerian passport, Relindise had to relinquish her Cameroonian citizenship. "I felt horrible to hand over my Cameroon citizenship. Initially I thought, 'No, I am not gonna do it. Over my dead body.' But with time I just had to see that if you want to live and work here, it is necessary," she said. The complicated application process to acquire German citizenship took six months. Also pictured are Sven Lenhard (L), Juergen Koglin (2nd L) and Falko Liecke (R) of the Neukoelln district council. Migration to Germany in 2012 was the highest since 1995. The migration rate between 2011- 2012 was up 13 percent, the German interior ministry reported January 15, 2014. Picture taken November 26, 2013. REUTERS/Thomas Peter (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION) less 
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Reuters | Photo By THOMAS PETER / REUTERS
Wed, Jan 15, 2014 11:17 AM EST