Anthony Lake, executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund, speaks to reporters during a global conference on combating world hunger at Dublin Castle in Ireland on Monday, April 15, 2013. A United Nations Children’s Fund report published Monday found that more than a quarter of children under the age of 5 worldwide are permanently "stunted" from malnutrition, leaving them physically and intellectually weak and representing a scandalous waste of human potential, according to the agency’s director. Anthony Lake, executive director of UNICEF since 2010, said better provision of vitamins, clean water and breastfeeding could have helped these 165 million children achieve normal brain and body development, but their lack of proper nutrition means instead they suffer increased vulnerability to illness and early death. (AP Photo/Shawn Pogatchnik)

Associated Press
Anthony Lake, executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund, speaks to reporters during a global conference on combating world hunger at Dublin Castle in Ireland on Monday, April 15, 2013. A United Nations Children’s Fund report published Monday found that more than a quarter of children under the age of 5 worldwide are permanently "stunted" from malnutrition, leaving them physically and intellectually weak and representing a scandalous waste of human potential, according to the agency’s director. Anthony Lake, executive director of UNICEF since 2010, said better provision of vitamins, clean water and breastfeeding could have helped these 165 million children achieve normal brain and body development, but their lack of proper nutrition means instead they suffer increased vulnerability to illness and early death. (AP Photo/Shawn Pogatchnik)
Anthony Lake, executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund, speaks to reporters during a global conference on combating world hunger at Dublin Castle in Ireland on Monday, April 15, 2013. A United Nations Children’s Fund report published Monday found that more than a quarter of children under the age of 5 worldwide are permanently "stunted" from malnutrition, leaving them physically and intellectually weak and representing a scandalous waste of human potential, according to the agency’s director. Anthony Lake, executive director of UNICEF since 2010, said better provision of vitamins, clean water and breastfeeding could have helped these 165 million children achieve normal brain and body development, but their lack of proper nutrition means instead they suffer increased vulnerability to illness and early death. (AP Photo/Shawn Pogatchnik)
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