Anti-death penalty advocates Vicki Schieber, left, and her husband, Sylvester, react as Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, not pictured, speaks at a news conference in Annapolis, Md., Friday, March 15, 2013, after the Maryland General Assembly approved a measure to ban capital punishment. The Schiebers have been working to repeal the capital punishment in Maryland since their daughter, Shannon, was raped and murdered. The bill now goes to O'Malley, who is expected to sign it. Maryland would become the 18th state to abolish the death penalty. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Associated Press
Anti-death penalty advocates Vicki Schieber, left, and her husband, Sylvester, react as Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, not pictured, speaks at a news conference in Annapolis, Md., Friday, March 15, 2013, after the Maryland General Assembly approved a measure to ban capital punishment. The Schiebers have been working to repeal the capital punishment in Maryland since their daughter, Shannon, was raped and murdered. The bill now goes to O'Malley, who is expected to sign it. Maryland would become the 18th state to abolish the death penalty. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Anti-death penalty advocates Vicki Schieber, left, and her husband, Sylvester, react as Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, not pictured, speaks at a news conference in Annapolis, Md., Friday, March 15, 2013, after the Maryland General Assembly approved a measure to ban capital punishment. The Schiebers have been working to repeal the capital punishment in Maryland since their daughter, Shannon, was raped and murdered. The bill now goes to O'Malley, who is expected to sign it. Maryland would become the 18th state to abolish the death penalty. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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