This Aug. 8, 2012, shows Peter Fix, a conservator, peers through a tiny window on a 40-foot-long, 8-feet-wide freeze dryer at the Texas A&M University Center for Maritime Archaeology and Conservation in Bryan, Texas. Researchers are using the gigantic freeze-dryer to remove moisture from the wreckage of a 17th-century French ship used by famed explorer La Salle and sank more than 300 years ago off the Texas coast. The vessel will become the centerpiece at a state history museum in Austin. (AP Photo/Michael Graczyk)

Associated Press
This Aug. 8, 2012, shows Peter Fix, a conservator, peers through a tiny window on a 40-foot-long, 8-feet-wide freeze dryer at the Texas A&M University Center for Maritime Archaeology and Conservation in Bryan, Texas. Researchers are using the gigantic freeze-dryer to remove moisture from the wreckage of a 17th-century French ship used by famed explorer La Salle and sank more than 300 years ago off the Texas coast.  The vessel will become the centerpiece at a state history museum in Austin. (AP Photo/Michael Graczyk)
This Aug. 8, 2012, shows Peter Fix, a conservator, peers through a tiny window on a 40-foot-long, 8-feet-wide freeze dryer at the Texas A&M University Center for Maritime Archaeology and Conservation in Bryan, Texas. Researchers are using the gigantic freeze-dryer to remove moisture from the wreckage of a 17th-century French ship used by famed explorer La Salle and sank more than 300 years ago off the Texas coast. The vessel will become the centerpiece at a state history museum in Austin. (AP Photo/Michael Graczyk)
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