Australian Carmen Cacha, who lost her son in the 2002 Bali bombings, looks at her son's photograph while paying her respects at the Bali Memorial Monument in Kuta, Bali, Indonesia on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard is scheduled to attend Friday's event remembering the Oct. 12, 2002, attacks that blasted two Bali nightclubs. The bombs killed 202 people, including 88 Australians and seven Americans. (AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati)

Associated Press
Australian Carmen Cacha, who lost her son in the 2002 Bali bombings, looks at her son's photograph while paying her respects at the Bali Memorial Monument in Kuta, Bali, Indonesia on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard is scheduled to attend Friday's event remembering the Oct. 12, 2002, attacks that blasted two Bali nightclubs. The bombs killed 202 people, including 88 Australians and seven Americans.  (AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati)
Australian Carmen Cacha, who lost her son in the 2002 Bali bombings, looks at her son's photograph while paying her respects at the Bali Memorial Monument in Kuta, Bali, Indonesia on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard is scheduled to attend Friday's event remembering the Oct. 12, 2002, attacks that blasted two Bali nightclubs. The bombs killed 202 people, including 88 Australians and seven Americans. (AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati)
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