This image released by the journal Science shows Lee R. Berger of the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa holding the cranium of Australopithecus sediba. A detailed analysis of 2 ... more 
This image released by the journal Science shows Lee R. Berger of the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa holding the cranium of Australopithecus sediba. A detailed analysis of 2 million-year-old bones found in South Africa offers the most powerful case so far in identifying the transitional figure that came before modern humans, findings some are calling a potential game-changer in understanding evolution. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Lee Berger and the University of Witwatersrand) less 
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Associated Press | Photo By Courtesy of Lee Berger and the University of Witwatersrand
Thu, Sep 8, 2011 10:24 AM EDT