Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, center, talks to workers during a tour of the train wheel manufacturers Lucchini UK, at Trafford Park, Manchester, England, Monday Jan. 28, 2013. The British government on Monday unveiled details of new high-speed rail lines linking London to cities in northern England with trains traveling up to 225 miles an hour (360 kph). The government says the project, known as High Speed 2, will be the first new railway built north of London for more than a century, and will be an economic and environmental boon. But opponents claim the plan is too expensive and will ruin tracts of picturesque countryside. (AP Photo/PA, Christopher Furlong) UNITED KINGDOM OUT NO SALES NO ARCHIVE

Associated Press
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, center, talks to workers during a tour of the train wheel manufacturers Lucchini UK, at Trafford Park, Manchester, England, Monday Jan. 28, 2013. The British government on Monday unveiled details of new high-speed rail lines linking London to cities in northern England with trains traveling up to 225 miles an hour (360 kph). The government says the project, known as High Speed 2, will be the first new railway built north of London for more than a century, and will be an economic and environmental boon. But opponents claim the plan is too expensive and will ruin tracts of picturesque countryside. (AP Photo/PA, Christopher Furlong) UNITED KINGDOM OUT  NO SALES  NO ARCHIVE
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, center, talks to workers during a tour of the train wheel manufacturers Lucchini UK, at Trafford Park, Manchester, England, Monday Jan. 28, 2013. The British government on Monday unveiled details of new high-speed rail lines linking London to cities in northern England with trains traveling up to 225 miles an hour (360 kph). The government says the project, known as High Speed 2, will be the first new railway built north of London for more than a century, and will be an economic and environmental boon. But opponents claim the plan is too expensive and will ruin tracts of picturesque countryside. (AP Photo/PA, Christopher Furlong) UNITED KINGDOM OUT NO SALES NO ARCHIVE
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