British Prime Minister David Cameron lays a wreath at the site of a notorious 1919 massacre of hundreds of Indians by British colonial forces, in Amritsar, India, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013. Cameron's action Wednesday marked the first time a British premier made such a gesture of condolence at Jallianwala Bagh in the northwest city of Amritsar, but he stopped short of issuing a formal apology for his country's actions 94 years earlier. More than 300 Indians were killed during the massacre, which galvanized the national independence movement and marked the beginning of the end of Britain's rule over the Indian subcontinent. (AP Photo)

Associated Press
British Prime Minister David Cameron lays a wreath at the site of a notorious 1919 massacre of hundreds of Indians by British colonial forces, in Amritsar, India, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013. Cameron's action Wednesday marked the first time a British premier made such a gesture of condolence at Jallianwala Bagh in the northwest city of Amritsar, but he stopped short of issuing a formal apology for his country's actions 94 years earlier.  More than 300 Indians were killed during the massacre, which galvanized the national independence movement and marked the beginning of the end of Britain's rule over the Indian subcontinent.  (AP Photo)
British Prime Minister David Cameron lays a wreath at the site of a notorious 1919 massacre of hundreds of Indians by British colonial forces, in Amritsar, India, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013. Cameron's action Wednesday marked the first time a British premier made such a gesture of condolence at Jallianwala Bagh in the northwest city of Amritsar, but he stopped short of issuing a formal apology for his country's actions 94 years earlier. More than 300 Indians were killed during the massacre, which galvanized the national independence movement and marked the beginning of the end of Britain's rule over the Indian subcontinent. (AP Photo)
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