A bill that would have made California the first state to require soft drinks to carry warning labels is pretty much dead. The bill wanted energy drinks, fruit drinks and certain sodas to include a ... more 
A bill that would have made California the first state to require soft drinks to carry warning labels is pretty much dead. The bill wanted energy drinks, fruit drinks and certain sodas to include a label read, "State Of California Safety Warning: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay." That statement is true, but California lawmakers struck down the bill 7-8 because the majority didn't believe a warning label would change consumers' behavior. The bill needed 10 votes to pass. Democratic Assemblyman Jimmy Gomez said warning labels on other products, such as tobacco, are paired with other requirements, like higher taxes, and that's the reason why people consume less. Democratic Senator Bill Monning, who proposed the warning labels, previously called for taxes on soda. Various surveys show that majority of California voters welcome the idea of using soda tax to fight obesity. However, it is not on the state's voting agenda yet. New York City banned large soft drinks in 2012. The ban prompted aggressive lobbying from the beverage industry. The industry generates about $20 billion in revenue in the U.S. from carbonated drinks. The total sales of all soft drinks, which also include bottled water and tea, is projected to be more than $120 billions in the U.S. in 2015. less 
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TheStreet
Wed, Jun 18, 2014 2:43 PM EDT