Charo Garcia speaks during an interview with The Associated Press at the UGT trade unions offices in Madrid Thursday May 5, 2011. Charo Garcia scrubs toilets for a living and used to do it with a ... more 
Charo Garcia speaks during an interview with The Associated Press at the UGT trade unions offices in Madrid Thursday May 5, 2011. Charo Garcia scrubs toilets for a living and used to do it with a smile. She sweeps, mops and does other dirty work at a high school, convinced that leaving desks and hallways nice and neat creates a better atmosphere for riotous teens to learn. There's just one problem: Garcia has not been paid for four months, and while her family budget was already lean, now it's utterly emaciated. She is far from alone.Garcia's plight is repeated across Spain as it struggles to crawl out of recession: myriad blue-collar workers, from gardeners to bricklayers but even B-league professional football players, are enduring months without getting paid as their employers squirm to stay afloat in an economy with limp growth and slim prospects for major improvement soon. less 
1 / 1
Associated Press | Photo By Paul White
Thu, May 19, 2011 5:01 AM EDT