Brett Galyean (L) and Jeff Freund watch as Chinook salmon smolts are transferred into trucks from the Coleman National Fish Hatchery in Anderson, California March 25, 2014. Workers moved approximately... more 
Brett Galyean (L) and Jeff Freund watch as Chinook salmon smolts are transferred into trucks from the Coleman National Fish Hatchery in Anderson, California March 25, 2014. Workers moved approximately 420,000 of the 30.4 million Chinook salmon that will be transported to locations downriver due to California's extreme drought. Salmon are typically released from hatcheries into the Sacramento River and its tributaries between April and June to begin their migration into the Pacific Ocean, where they spend about three years before a small number of survivors begin their upstream run back to the hatcheries to spawn. But this year water levels in the Sacramento River and its offshoots - the main passageways for California hatchery-spawned salmon out to sea - have dwindled to dangerously low levels. REUTERS/Nick Adams (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT) less 
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Reuters | Photo By NICK ADAMS / REUTERS
Tue, Mar 25, 2014 5:30 PM EDT