A combination photo shows (L) Oh Dae-keun, 60, who was one of the participants in the latest inter-Korean reunion for families separated by the 1950-53 Korean War posing at his office in Seoul March ... more 
A combination photo shows (L) Oh Dae-keun, 60, who was one of the participants in the latest inter-Korean reunion for families separated by the 1950-53 Korean War posing at his office in Seoul March 13, 2014 and (R) holding a reunion application form showing his older brother's photo. Oh said: "At the family reunions this year, I met my older brother who I was separated from even before I was born. My brother fought in the war as a volunteer when he was 17. He secretly joined the South Korean army without telling our family so naturally we all thought he was dead in the war when he disappeared. After the war was over, we missed him dearly and waited for him for several years. We didn't even know he had gone over to North Korea. If we knew he had, we would've registered for the family reunions.' Asked if he had any regrets, Oh said: 'I wish I could've met my brother a few years earlier since he isn't in good condition right now.' He said he wrote down his brother's address, hoping to be able to send him letters. The latest family reunion for those separated in North and South Korea was held on February 20-25 at the Mount Kumgang resort just north of the border and a total of 813 family members met in tears and joy. On March 17, a report on North Korea will be presented to the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva. Pictures taken March 13, 2014. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: SOCIETY CONFLICT) ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 09 OF 10 FOR PACKAGE 'MEMENTOS OF KOREA'S DIVIDED FAMILIES'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'MEMORY HONG-JI' less 
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Reuters | Photo By KIM HONG-JI / REUTERS
Sun, Mar 16, 2014 4:10 AM EDT