A combination of two formerly unknown paintings by German artist Otto Dix are beamed to a wall November 5, 2013, in an Augsburg courtroom during a news conference held by state prosecutor Reinhard ... more 
A combination of two formerly unknown paintings by German artist Otto Dix are beamed to a wall November 5, 2013, in an Augsburg courtroom during a news conference held by state prosecutor Reinhard Nemetz and expert art historian Meike Hoffmann from the Berlin Free University. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler's propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. Picture at left shows a self-portrait of Otto Dix smoking. REUTERS/Michael Dalder (GERMANY - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS SOCIETY) less 
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Reuters | Photo By MICHAEL DALDER / REUTERS
Tue, Nov 5, 2013 6:55 AM EST