CORRECTS DAY OF THE WEEK - NASA's Global Hawk 872 Takes off for HS3 Science Flight #5 on Tuesday Sept. 4, 2012 less than 5 hours after NASA 871 landed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va. The flight of NASA 872 takeoff marks the first “back-to-back” flights of two Global Hawks in the same day for HS3. NASA is using former military surveillance drones to help study how tropical storms intensify. The unmanned Global Hawk aircraft are taking off from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, where they’re studying storms that form over the Atlantic Ocean. NASA officials say while forecasting models predicting a storm’s path have improved greatly over the past few decades, there hasn’t been much progress producing models that predict a hurricane’s strength. (AP Photo/NASA)

Associated Press
CORRECTS DAY OF THE WEEK - NASA's Global Hawk 872 Takes off for HS3 Science Flight #5 on Tuesday Sept. 4, 2012 less than 5 hours after NASA 871 landed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va. The flight of NASA 872 takeoff marks the first “back-to-back” flights of two Global Hawks in the same day for HS3. NASA is using former military surveillance drones to help study how tropical storms intensify. The unmanned Global Hawk aircraft are taking off from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, where they’re studying storms that form over the Atlantic Ocean. NASA officials say while forecasting models predicting a storm’s path have improved greatly over the past few decades, there hasn’t been much progress producing models that predict a hurricane’s strength. (AP Photo/NASA)
CORRECTS DAY OF THE WEEK - NASA's Global Hawk 872 Takes off for HS3 Science Flight #5 on Tuesday Sept. 4, 2012 less than 5 hours after NASA 871 landed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va. The flight of NASA 872 takeoff marks the first “back-to-back” flights of two Global Hawks in the same day for HS3. NASA is using former military surveillance drones to help study how tropical storms intensify. The unmanned Global Hawk aircraft are taking off from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, where they’re studying storms that form over the Atlantic Ocean. NASA officials say while forecasting models predicting a storm’s path have improved greatly over the past few decades, there hasn’t been much progress producing models that predict a hurricane’s strength. (AP Photo/NASA)
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