The rulings on DOMA and Proposition 8 by the Supreme Court are definitely huge starting victories for same-sex marriage in the United States. We would have liked a sweeping nationwide victory; ... more 
The rulings on DOMA and Proposition 8 by the Supreme Court are definitely huge starting victories for same-sex marriage in the United States. We would have liked a sweeping nationwide victory; however, that was not the ruling. Once California begins same-sex marriages again, approximately 30 percent of U.S. citizens will now have the right to same-sex marriage recognized at the federal level.

The fight for our civil rights will not be over until 100 percent of U.S. citizens have the right to same-sex marriage. This is very important when it comes to taxes, health insurance, immigration, Social Security benefits and basic human rights.

Let me introduce us. I am Jeff, 29, and I work in finance. My husband is Johnny, 26, and he works in the health care field. He currently gets taxed on the “fair market value” of my health insurance plan, which is a huge and unfair financial burden on us. Some corporations cover this cost for their employees; his does not.

Income taxes are just another reminder of the prejudice and inequality we face. We live in New Jersey a state that offers civil unions; we have identical rights at the state level as any married heterosexual couple. Our Republican governor, Chris Christie, recently vetoed a same-sex marriage bill, stating he supports equal rights for same-sex couples but stops short of calling it marriage.

Unfortunately, the Supreme Court did not include civil unions in the DOMA ruling. Your state must currently call it marriage to be recognized at the federal level. There are several ways being considered to achieve full same-sex marriage equality in the state of New Jersey that would then be recognized at the federal level. Many are hoping New Jersey will be the next state to do so.

We are extremely happy with the decisions, but still left feeling like second-class citizens and have many unanswered questions. What happens when a same-sex married couple moves to a different state? Will the Supreme Court eventually decide that same-sex couples have the constitutional right to marriage in the United States of America, home of the free? These, plus many other questions will be answered over time. For now, we wait—but not silently.

We received nothing but love and support from our family and friends. Love knows no gender.

—Jeff, left, and Johnny Farlow, married in a civil union in New Jersey on April 7, 2012 less 
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Yahoo News | Photo By Photo courtesy of Jeff and Johnny Farlow
Wed, Jun 26, 2013 9:00 PM EDT