David Anselmi, a Microsoft senior manger of investigations in the company's Digital Crimes Unit, walks out of the DCU lab there Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, in Redmond, Wash. Documents unsealed Thursday by a federal court in Virginia describe a new front in a legal campaign against cybercrime being waged by Microsoft. The company says evidence shows cybercriminals are now looking for opportunities to inject malicious software and code into counterfeit versions of computer operating systems even before the machines are wrapped in plastic and sold to unsuspecting customers. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Associated Press
David Anselmi, a Microsoft senior manger of investigations in the company's Digital Crimes Unit, walks out of the DCU lab there Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, in Redmond, Wash. Documents unsealed Thursday by a federal court in Virginia describe a new front in a legal campaign against cybercrime being waged by Microsoft. The company says evidence shows cybercriminals are now looking for opportunities to inject malicious software and code into counterfeit versions of computer operating systems even before the machines are wrapped in plastic and sold to unsuspecting customers. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
David Anselmi, a Microsoft senior manger of investigations in the company's Digital Crimes Unit, walks out of the DCU lab there Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, in Redmond, Wash. Documents unsealed Thursday by a federal court in Virginia describe a new front in a legal campaign against cybercrime being waged by Microsoft. The company says evidence shows cybercriminals are now looking for opportunities to inject malicious software and code into counterfeit versions of computer operating systems even before the machines are wrapped in plastic and sold to unsuspecting customers. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
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