In this Dec. 28, 2012 photo, a vendor talks on a cell phone at a store in the Mare shantytown in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The city’s densest neighborhoods, its favelas, or shantytowns blanket entire hillsides, providing most of the city’s affordable housing. Government officials have traditionally considered them eyesores and literally left them off the map, condemning millions to legal invisibility. Now, those communities are being charted after decades of informality, each route and alley outlined and their names researched. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

Associated Press
In this Dec. 28, 2012 photo, a vendor talks on a cell phone at a store in the Mare shantytown in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The city’s densest neighborhoods, its favelas, or shantytowns blanket entire hillsides, providing most of the city’s affordable housing. Government officials have traditionally considered them eyesores and literally left them off the map, condemning millions to legal invisibility. Now, those communities are being charted after decades of informality, each route and alley outlined and their names researched. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this Dec. 28, 2012 photo, a vendor talks on a cell phone at a store in the Mare shantytown in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The city’s densest neighborhoods, its favelas, or shantytowns blanket entire hillsides, providing most of the city’s affordable housing. Government officials have traditionally considered them eyesores and literally left them off the map, condemning millions to legal invisibility. Now, those communities are being charted after decades of informality, each route and alley outlined and their names researched. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
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