In this Dec. 3, 2012 photo, the covers of two editions of the new Jamaican patois translation of the New Testament are shown at the office of the Bible Society of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica. After years of translation from the original Greek, the Bible Society is releasing in Jamaica print and audio CD versions of the first patois translation of the New Testament, or "Di Jamiekan Nyuu Testiment." The language was created by slaves who were brought to the island by European colonizers, and some say it was designed to prevent slave masters from understanding their words. (AP Photo/David McFadden)

Associated Press
In this Dec. 3, 2012 photo, the covers of two editions of the new Jamaican patois translation of the New Testament are shown at the office of the Bible Society of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica. After years of translation from the original Greek, the Bible Society is releasing in Jamaica print and audio CD versions of the first patois translation of the New Testament, or "Di Jamiekan Nyuu Testiment." The language was created by slaves who were brought to the island by European colonizers, and some say it was designed to prevent slave masters from understanding their words. (AP Photo/David McFadden)
In this Dec. 3, 2012 photo, the covers of two editions of the new Jamaican patois translation of the New Testament are shown at the office of the Bible Society of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica. After years of translation from the original Greek, the Bible Society is releasing in Jamaica print and audio CD versions of the first patois translation of the New Testament, or "Di Jamiekan Nyuu Testiment." The language was created by slaves who were brought to the island by European colonizers, and some say it was designed to prevent slave masters from understanding their words. (AP Photo/David McFadden)
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