General Motors Co may end up compensating many more people than the families of 13 victims it has linked to a faulty ignition switch, as it considers waiving key legal defenses in order to resolve ... more 
General Motors Co may end up compensating many more people than the families of 13 victims it has linked to a faulty ignition switch, as it considers waiving key legal defenses in order to resolve injury and death cases out of court. Details of the compensation program, while still not final, began to emerge during congressional testimony by GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra on Wednesday and in subsequent interviews with plaintiffs' lawyers. Barra said the program, expected to be announced by July, will not reject claims based on a previous settlement with GM or the company's bankruptcy status at the time of the accident. On Wednesday, U.S. Representative Diana DeGette of Colorado suggested during the hearing there could be as many as 100 deaths linked to the faulty switch, which has prompted a recall of 2.6 million vehicles since February. GM has so far acknowledged 13 fatalities in connection with the defect. less 
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Wochit
Thu, Jun 19, 2014 8:33 PM EDT