Dolls dressed in local attire are arranged on a table at a workshop in Surulere district, in Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos January 8, 2014. With a booming economy in Nigeria and more black ... more 
Dolls dressed in local attire are arranged on a table at a workshop in Surulere district, in Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos January 8, 2014. With a booming economy in Nigeria and more black children than anywhere else in the world, Taofick Okoya was dismayed some years ago when he couldn't find a black doll for his niece. The 43-year-old spotted a gap in the market and with little competition from foreign firms he set up his own business. He outsourced manufacturing of doll parts to low-cost China, assembled them onshore and added a twist - traditional Nigerian costumes. Seven years on, Okoya sells between 6,000 and 9,000 of his "Queens of Africa" and "Naija Princesses" a month, and reckons he has 10-15 percent of a small but fast-growing market. Picture taken January 8, 2014. To match NIGERIA-DOLLS/ REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye (NIGERIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY INDUSTRIAL) less 
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Reuters | Photo By AKINTUNDE AKINLEYE / REUTERS
Wed, Jan 15, 2014 6:03 AM EST