Dr. Doug Scharre, left, administers neurological cognitive tests to Kathleen Sanford Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio. Sanford is an Alzheimer's patient that has a deep brain stimulation implant as part of a study at Ohio State University. In small experiments, scientists are implanting pacemaker-like devices deep in the brains of some people with early-stage Alzheimer's in hopes of slowing the disease's damage. The tiny wires send mild jolts of electricity to stimulate the brain. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Associated Press
Dr. Doug Scharre, left, administers neurological cognitive tests to Kathleen Sanford Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio. Sanford is an Alzheimer's patient that has a deep brain stimulation implant as part of a study at Ohio State University. In small experiments, scientists are implanting pacemaker-like devices deep in the brains of some people with early-stage Alzheimer's in hopes of slowing the disease's damage. The tiny wires send mild jolts of electricity to stimulate the brain.  (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)
Dr. Doug Scharre, left, administers neurological cognitive tests to Kathleen Sanford Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio. Sanford is an Alzheimer's patient that has a deep brain stimulation implant as part of a study at Ohio State University. In small experiments, scientists are implanting pacemaker-like devices deep in the brains of some people with early-stage Alzheimer's in hopes of slowing the disease's damage. The tiny wires send mild jolts of electricity to stimulate the brain. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)
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