Dr. Elizabeth McNally (L) and genetic councilor Lisa Castillo are reflected in a computer monitor as they review genetic data from a family with Cardiomyopathy at the Cardiovascular Research Institute... more 
Dr. Elizabeth McNally (L) and genetic councilor Lisa Castillo are reflected in a computer monitor as they review genetic data from a family with Cardiomyopathy at the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the University of Chicago in Chicago, March 4, 2014. When President Bill Clinton announced in 2000 that Craig Venter and Dr. Francis Collins of the National Human Genome Research Institute had succeeded in mapping the human genome, he solemnly declared that the discovery would "revolutionize" the treatment of virtually all human disease. Recently, a combination of lower-cost sequencing technology and a growing list of wins in narrow corners of medicine are starting to show that genomic medicine is on the verge of delivering on at least some of those early claims. Picture taken March 4, 2014. To match Analysis GENOMICS-FUTURE/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY) less 
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Reuters | Photo By JIM YOUNG / REUTERS
Thu, Mar 6, 2014 9:17 PM EST