A elderly man looks at a barricade with graffiti reading, ''Freedom for headscarf, freedom for alcohol'' at the Taksim square in Istanbul, Thursday, June 6, 2013. In the first days of the protests last week, Erdogan dismissed the demonstrators as “capulcu” - a Turkish word which translates as marauder, looter or plunderer. Protesters quickly turned the word to their advantage. They made it their own, Anglicizing it and turning it into a brand new verb, “Capulling” - which means protesting, resisting the tear gas and shouting anti-Erdogan slogans. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

Associated Press
A elderly man looks at a barricade with graffiti reading, ''Freedom for headscarf, freedom for alcohol'' at the Taksim square in Istanbul, Thursday, June 6, 2013. In the first days of the protests last week, Erdogan dismissed the demonstrators as “capulcu” - a Turkish word which translates as marauder, looter or plunderer. Protesters quickly turned the word to their advantage. They made it their own, Anglicizing it and turning it into a brand new verb, “Capulling” - which means protesting, resisting the tear gas and shouting anti-Erdogan slogans. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)
A elderly man looks at a barricade with graffiti reading, ''Freedom for headscarf, freedom for alcohol'' at the Taksim square in Istanbul, Thursday, June 6, 2013. In the first days of the protests last week, Erdogan dismissed the demonstrators as “capulcu” - a Turkish word which translates as marauder, looter or plunderer. Protesters quickly turned the word to their advantage. They made it their own, Anglicizing it and turning it into a brand new verb, “Capulling” - which means protesting, resisting the tear gas and shouting anti-Erdogan slogans. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)
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