The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings ... more 
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler's propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY) less 
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Reuters | Photo By DOMINIC EBENBICHLER / REUTERS
Wed, Nov 6, 2013 8:43 AM EST