This Feb. 2011 photo provided by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board shows a dust sample being taken at the Hoeganaes Corporation in Gallatin, Tenn., following an explosion earlier that month. When the ... more 
This Feb. 2011 photo provided by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board shows a dust sample being taken at the Hoeganaes Corporation in Gallatin, Tenn., following an explosion earlier that month. When the Obama administration agreed to set the first-ever federal limits on runoff in Florida, environmental groups thought the state’s waters would finally get clean from a nutrient overdose that spawns algal blooms, suffocates rivers, lakes and streams, and forms byproducts in drinking water that could make people sick. The Florida rule is one of a string of regulations delayed at federal agencies, or at the White House office responsible for reviewing new rules. Together, they highlight the administration’s cautiousness in an election year, where it has been increasingly under attack by Republicans and business groups for favoring big government and costly regulations that they allege kill jobs. (AP Photo/U.S. Chemical Safety Board) less 
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Associated Press | Photo By U.S. Chemical Safety Board
Mon, Jul 30, 2012 12:53 PM EDT