This Feb. 7, 2010 photo provided by Jake Hug shows him, center, with fellow students Brahim Mellouli, left, and Toshiro Baum from the International Institute of Higher Education in Morocco, in the Djemma el-Fna square in Marrakech, Morocco during a road trip. Hug, a recent graduate of Elmhurst College in Illinois, was looking for a “big change from Chicago.” With little knowledge of the country or Arabic, he took a full year away to study in a Moroccan university where he was the only American. He was grateful his program didn’t mollycoddle him. Moroccans were welcoming and he resisted the temptation to hang out with his compatriots. After decades of laissez-faire and faith that just breathing the air in foreign lands broadens horizons, American colleges and international programs are pressing students harder to get out of their comfort zones. (AP Photo)

Associated Press
This Feb. 7, 2010 photo provided by Jake Hug shows him, center, with fellow students Brahim Mellouli, left, and Toshiro Baum from the International Institute of Higher Education in Morocco, in the Djemma el-Fna square in Marrakech, Morocco during a road trip. Hug, a recent graduate of Elmhurst College in Illinois, was looking for a “big change from Chicago.” With little knowledge of the country or Arabic, he took a full year away to study in a Moroccan university where he was the only American. He was grateful his program didn’t mollycoddle him. Moroccans were welcoming and he resisted the temptation to hang out with his compatriots. After decades of laissez-faire and faith that just breathing the air in foreign lands broadens horizons, American colleges and international programs are pressing students harder to get out of their comfort zones. (AP Photo)
This Feb. 7, 2010 photo provided by Jake Hug shows him, center, with fellow students Brahim Mellouli, left, and Toshiro Baum from the International Institute of Higher Education in Morocco, in the Djemma el-Fna square in Marrakech, Morocco during a road trip. Hug, a recent graduate of Elmhurst College in Illinois, was looking for a “big change from Chicago.” With little knowledge of the country or Arabic, he took a full year away to study in a Moroccan university where he was the only American. He was grateful his program didn’t mollycoddle him. Moroccans were welcoming and he resisted the temptation to hang out with his compatriots. After decades of laissez-faire and faith that just breathing the air in foreign lands broadens horizons, American colleges and international programs are pressing students harder to get out of their comfort zones. (AP Photo)
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