FILE – In this 1989 file photo Mohammed Rashed speaks during his trial in Athens, Greece, in connection with a fatal 1982 Pan Am 830 bombing. Rashed tucked a bomb beneath a jetliner seat cushion, set the timer and disembarked with his wife and child when the flight touched down in Tokyo. The device exploded as the jet continued on to Honolulu, killing a Japanese teenager in an attack that investigators linked to a terrorist organization known for making sophisticated bombs. It would be 20 years before the Jordanian-born bomber, and one-time apprentice to Abu Ibrahim, currently featured on the FBI list of most wanted terrorists, would admit guilt in an American courtroom. Now, credited for his cooperation against associates, Rashed is about to be freed from federal prison after more than two decades behind bars in Greece and the United States. (AP Photo/File)

Associated Press
FILE – In this 1989 file photo Mohammed Rashed speaks during his trial in Athens, Greece, in connection with a fatal 1982 Pan Am 830 bombing. Rashed tucked a bomb beneath a jetliner seat cushion, set the timer and disembarked with his wife and child when the flight touched down in Tokyo. The device exploded as the jet continued on to Honolulu, killing a Japanese teenager in an attack that investigators linked to a terrorist organization known for making sophisticated bombs. It would be 20 years before the Jordanian-born bomber, and one-time apprentice to Abu Ibrahim, currently featured on the FBI list of most wanted terrorists, would admit guilt in an American courtroom. Now, credited for his cooperation against associates, Rashed is about to be freed from federal prison after more than two decades behind bars in Greece and the United States. (AP Photo/File)
FILE – In this 1989 file photo Mohammed Rashed speaks during his trial in Athens, Greece, in connection with a fatal 1982 Pan Am 830 bombing. Rashed tucked a bomb beneath a jetliner seat cushion, set the timer and disembarked with his wife and child when the flight touched down in Tokyo. The device exploded as the jet continued on to Honolulu, killing a Japanese teenager in an attack that investigators linked to a terrorist organization known for making sophisticated bombs. It would be 20 years before the Jordanian-born bomber, and one-time apprentice to Abu Ibrahim, currently featured on the FBI list of most wanted terrorists, would admit guilt in an American courtroom. Now, credited for his cooperation against associates, Rashed is about to be freed from federal prison after more than two decades behind bars in Greece and the United States. (AP Photo/File)
View Comments (0)