FILE - This 2005 file photo provided by fisheries biologist Jim Franks of the University of Southern Mississippi's Gulf Coast Research Laboratory shows a larval bluefin tuna. Caught within days of ... more 
FILE - This 2005 file photo provided by fisheries biologist Jim Franks of the University of Southern Mississippi's Gulf Coast Research Laboratory shows a larval bluefin tuna. Caught within days of hatching in the Gulf of Mexico's loop current, it was 5 millimeters long _ about one-fifth of an inch. Adults can grow up to 1,500 pounds, and average 600 pounds. NOAA scientists say the Gulf of Mexico is the only known spawning area for western Atlantic bluefin tuna, and the location of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill happened in the precise place at just the right time to threaten the delicate larvae bobbing on the surface. less 
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Associated Press | Photo By Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Jim Franks, File
Wed, Oct 20, 2010 6:35 PM EDT