FILE - In this 2006 file photo provided by the National Park Service, tourists climb Half Dome at Yosemite National Park, Calif. The trail of dirt and hundreds of feet of twisted metal cables might not immediately conjure an image of something worthy of historical preservation. But when the trail leads to the iconic Half Dome in Yosemite National Park and the cables allow armchair wilderness lovers to ascend the once-inaccessible granite monolith, the significance becomes enough for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. While such a move might go unnoticed, as it did last month, the timing and significance are critical as Half Dome hikers and wilderness advocates await the park’s final assessment of a plan to permanently limit access to a place on many outdoor lovers’ bucket lists. (AP Photo/National Park Service, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this 2006 file photo provided by the National Park Service, tourists climb Half Dome at Yosemite National Park, Calif. The trail of dirt and hundreds of feet of twisted metal cables might not immediately conjure an image of something worthy of historical preservation. But when the trail leads to the iconic Half Dome in Yosemite National Park and the cables allow armchair wilderness lovers to ascend the once-inaccessible granite monolith, the significance becomes enough for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. While such a move might go unnoticed, as it did last month, the timing and significance are critical as Half Dome hikers and wilderness advocates await the park’s final assessment of a plan to permanently limit access to a place on many outdoor lovers’ bucket lists.  (AP Photo/National Park Service, File)
FILE - In this 2006 file photo provided by the National Park Service, tourists climb Half Dome at Yosemite National Park, Calif. The trail of dirt and hundreds of feet of twisted metal cables might not immediately conjure an image of something worthy of historical preservation. But when the trail leads to the iconic Half Dome in Yosemite National Park and the cables allow armchair wilderness lovers to ascend the once-inaccessible granite monolith, the significance becomes enough for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. While such a move might go unnoticed, as it did last month, the timing and significance are critical as Half Dome hikers and wilderness advocates await the park’s final assessment of a plan to permanently limit access to a place on many outdoor lovers’ bucket lists. (AP Photo/National Park Service, File)
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