FILE - In this April 12, 2011, file photo, Medicare Administrator Donald Berwick gestures during an interview with The Associated Press in Washington. People targeted by health care distortions say the attacks can accomplish two things: turning an individual into a pariah, and shutting down legitimate consideration of new ideas. Berwick, President Barack Obama's first Medicare chief, said he was never able to overcome the label of “rationer-in-chief” pinned on him by GOP critics of the health law, no matter how often he said he was against rationing. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

Associated Press
FILE - In this April 12, 2011, file photo, Medicare Administrator Donald Berwick gestures during an interview with The Associated Press in Washington. People targeted by health care distortions say the attacks can accomplish two things: turning an individual into a pariah, and shutting down legitimate consideration of new ideas. Berwick, President Barack Obama's first Medicare chief, said he was never able to overcome the label of “rationer-in-chief” pinned on him by GOP critics of the health law, no matter how often he said he was against rationing. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)
FILE - In this April 12, 2011, file photo, Medicare Administrator Donald Berwick gestures during an interview with The Associated Press in Washington. People targeted by health care distortions say the attacks can accomplish two things: turning an individual into a pariah, and shutting down legitimate consideration of new ideas. Berwick, President Barack Obama's first Medicare chief, said he was never able to overcome the label of “rationer-in-chief” pinned on him by GOP critics of the health law, no matter how often he said he was against rationing. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)
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