FILE - This Aug. 1, 2012 file photo shows Janice Durflinger at her workplace in Lincoln, Neb., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. The 56 million people who get Social Security benefits shouldn’t expect a big increase in their monthly payments next year. The cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA, is determined by a government measure of inflation, and the measure shows that consumer prices have barely increased over the past year _ a revelation that might come as a surprise to seniors who spend more of their income on health care than younger adults. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

Associated Press
FILE - This Aug. 1, 2012 file photo shows Janice Durflinger at her workplace in Lincoln, Neb., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. The 56 million people who get Social Security benefits shouldn’t expect a big increase in their monthly payments next year. The cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA, is determined by a government measure of inflation, and the measure shows that consumer prices have barely increased over the past year _ a revelation that might come as a surprise to seniors who spend more of their income on health care than younger adults. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
FILE - This Aug. 1, 2012 file photo shows Janice Durflinger at her workplace in Lincoln, Neb., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. The 56 million people who get Social Security benefits shouldn’t expect a big increase in their monthly payments next year. The cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA, is determined by a government measure of inflation, and the measure shows that consumer prices have barely increased over the past year _ a revelation that might come as a surprise to seniors who spend more of their income on health care than younger adults. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
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